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BLOCK MAGAZINE
NETHERLANDS
Review
(click here for Dutch)

Winter, 1998

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In 12 self-written songs, Ronnie Baker Brooks makes it very clear what his  influences are. The long stretched guitar fills in the opening song, which is also the title song, sound very much like Albert King in his early years and the solo has, as far as phrasing goes, alot in common with SRV. The influence of SRV is certainly not limited to that song only. The intro of "You Make Me Feel So Good" for example, seems to be directly derived from Vaughan's "Crossfire."  Ronnie has also apparently been listening alot to Albert Collins, as we can hear in "Baby Please (Come Back Home)."  A night of RBB means alot of variation: smashing shuffles, soulful ballads like "Where Do I Stand In Line,"  blues songs telling you all about lost loves, funky songs and one song "Bald Headed Woman" based on the Elmore James "Dust" theme in which Ronnie has got that rancid Hound Dog Taylor sound. Of course there's also a duet with his dad and even producer Jellybean Johnson performs a guest role on the guitar. Ronnie concludes with an acoustic solo tune, which can be seen as an ode to the many blues artists that have passed away in the last few years. This CD should not have to be released under RBB's own control. It contains excellent compositions from the masterfully singing and playing Ronnie. There is also no fault to find with the arrangements and production. The experienced studio team, complete with backup vocals and little horn section, makes this work a real piece of art. Hopefully the CD gets another chance with a big label.

-- Rien Wisse

*Special thanks to Jan Helsen for translation assistance.*

 

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